Be Good

I find it amazing that very few people understand the direct correlation between doing good things and being in a position to negotiate. If you find that you are fearful, it’s probably because you are doing something that is wrong. There is nothing to fear if you’re doing what is right. So, consistently making good decisions places you in a great position.

Honor

When someone gets in trouble, think corrective or disciplinary actions, they tend to get very defensive.  I find the best approach is to try to talk through what the expectations are, and demonstrate that I’m looking at the overall picture, not isolated incidents.  I also do this with my children.  When I’m talking about honoring our elders, it is insufficient to constantly wait to be given tasks, they should anticipate need.

This is the principle, as people, we are engaged in helping our community, our family, and ourselves every day.  Rather than waiting for needs to become acute, it’s better to plan ahead and be addressing needs when they are relatively minor.  Just like an ounce of prevention versus a pound of cure.

Civilization

The foundation of happy and productive society is correct and mutually held principles.  Should the United States have an “everyone is welcome to be a citizen” immigration policy?  No.  Only people who agree or, maybe, commit to agree as soon as possible with the principles that make America successful should be allowed citizenship.  This blog is dedicated to enumerating those principles.

Read More: Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes

Labels

I was taught that Barry Goldwater was a basic left-wing lunatic in school.  I don’t know where I got that impression, nothing could be further from the truth.  He’s morally, economically, and socially conservative.  He has sound principles and articulates real issue that restrain the US.  But in today’s world, isn’t the most ridiculous label always chosen?  Don’t we wallow in a stye of absurd projections?

Read More: Conscience of a Conservative by Barry Goldwater

Creeping

It’s an American idiom, but take a moment to compare the term “creeping fascism” to “creeping capitalism.”  The former is used frequently in speech and writing, while the second is so absurd that it doesn’t make sense.  Why must fascism creep?  It creeps because fascism is a very foreign concept to most, as of writing, Americans.  Most people do not intuitively understand what fascism is, and neither do they agree with the principles of fascism.  I find this amusing because while Antifa – “against fascism” if I understand their public persona – routinely rallies against self-reliance, individualism, and moral absolutes; these are principles of capitalism – private ownership and a free market economy.  Conversely, fascism is exemplified by government control of the economy: public ownership and no economy.

Natural Law

In today’s litigious society, it is easy to confuse natural law with common law.  In his excellent treatise on English law, Blackstone lays out the three types of law, why they exist, and their purpose.  Of course in today’s public school curriculum, there isn’t any exposure to law.  This leads to confusion by US citizens about what law is, and how they act in light of precedence.

Natural law are the laws that govern the fabric of the universe.  It is impossible to “break” those laws, but it is possible to find that the known model or interpretation of that law is inaccurate or incomplete.  An example of a natural law is the speed of light.  Please don’t confuse the speed of light with the speed limit on the way to work.  Just because the former takes precedence, the later is an example of a regulation that brings order and safety.

Read More: Commentaries on the Laws of England (Book 1) by William Blackstone

Be BIG

Thanksgiving is a reminder that a benevolent being is caring for us.  You can prove this yourself.  If we work hard, are persistent, and are building based on valid principles, we can still achieve the American Dream.

Divine Rights

The United States’ Declaration of Independence states “that they [men] are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights.”  Like all philosophical assertions, this statement is only true if an assumption, at least one, is agreed to: rights are conditional on accepting responsibility.  Another way of saying that, is my right to freedom is conditional on my adherence to a social contract.  In the US that contract is primarily the golden rule: treat others like you want them to treat you.